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One chart shows just how dire WeWork’s revenue situation is

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One chart shows just how dire WeWork’s revenue situation is

Category : entrepreneur

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  • A simple chart showing WeWork’s revenues plotted against its losses over time raises an existential question…
  • Can this company survive?

When The We Company pulled its IPO for WeWork in September it stopped disclosing its financial statements in the full, formal way required by SEC rules.

Instead, as the crisis at the company rumbles on, it published a less formal Q3 2019 presentation to investors, obtained by Business Insider a few days ago. That deck shows WeWork suffered a net loss of $1.3 billion on revenues of $934 million in Q3.

When you plot the company’s revenue growth against its growing losses you get a dramatic snapshot of just how ugly WeWork’s business is right now:

Wework Q3 2019

These numbers combine WeWork’s regular revenue plus its “other” revenue. WeWork did not disclose net loss after non-cash costs in Q3.
Business Insider / The We Co

It is normal for a new company to make losses in its early years. Companies going public often carry losses on their books. It is normal to burn investment money in order to grow and scale a business. As long as the underlying business is solid, temporary losses aren’t really a problem.

Previously, WeWork’s losses were lower than its revenues. In some quarters, losses even declined. That suggested these losses could be pared or reversed completely at some point in the future. Indeed, WeWork’s revenues are growing nicely.

What the above chart shows, however, is a company whose losses are increasing as time goes by. The more WeWork grows, the worse it gets. WeWork now spends about $2.25 in order to generate every $1 in revenue.

Obviously, this company is in no condition to do an IPO.

A bad sign gets worse

In Q3, the losses vastly eclipsed revenues. That underscores an existential question around WeWork: Is this company a “going concern”? The term “going concern” is the official jargon accountants use when they believe there is a realistic prospect that the company might go bankrupt.

On the numbers above, from WeWork’s own investor deck, it is difficult to imagine that this company can survive.

There are some things we don’t know. WeWork’s latest presentation doesn’t give a full set of official financial statements, and they may include cashflow information that would make the picture rosier. WeWork does have the ability to generate positive cashflow and it can make some buildings profitable.

But, on WeWork’s own numbers, there is no sign of that helping the company’s income statement.

  • Read more:
  • New WeWork financials show growing debt in its international unit
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About Author

Sammy Singh

Global VC, Founder, and entrepreneur extraordinaire as featured in Inc. Magazine, Bloomberg, and Forbes. Sammy Singh is a graduate of UCLA and Wharton School of Business as well as a former student of Loyola University of Chicago. Sammy is best known as a renowned financial technology global entrepreneur and has founded over 26 different firms across industry and all over the world. He is a venture capitalist,a TV/ Film actor, tax specialist, and marketing solutions strategist. Connect with Sammy Singh on social media below! www.linkedin.com/in/cfo www.instagram.com/champagnegqpapi www.facebook.com/officialsammysingh www.twitter.com/cxosynergy www.medium.com/@sammysingh www.crunchbase.com/sammysingh

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